soramaruu:

HQ Noctis and Ace artwork

omirice:

yawn

assquill:

there are many things that have changed about nanase haruka as he’s grown both physically and emotionally over the years, but his ability to look 400% done with a situation is exactly the same no matter what and im so glad

HONESTLY: REBLOG THIS IF YOU HAVE EVER SELF HARMED IN ANY WAY, SKIPPED A MEAL ON PURPOSE, BEEN DEPRESSED, FELT ALONE IN A CROWDED ROOM, HATED YOUR BODY, HATED YOURSELF, FELT LIKE YOU’RE NOT GOOD ENOUGH OR BEEN TOLD YOU WERENT, CRIED YOURSELF TO SLEEP, FELT SUICIDAL OR BEEN SUICIDAL

(Source: uhsorry)

neeneegoose:

#free_69min: ghibli! i worked really hard on these puns okay

thefieryassassin:

Arno & Elise concept art

tags:
#nezushi
#nezumi
#shion
#otp
#no.6

krystal-tsuki:

||| That's  OUR  truth, Nezumi. |||

gaarakagez:

"This is the body of a sinner who encroached upon God's territory."

linguisdicks:

Manly men use manly words and…stuff

One of the most difficult aspects of Japanese language is the subtle differences in word usage that come with gender, age, relative ‘status’ in a group, all manner of cultural fripperies we must contend with. Use the wrong personal pronoun or verb ending, and you could very well be branded an uncultured rube or, worse yet, just another gaijin *gasp*

But it’s not always our own words we need to be concerned with; sometimes it’s just as difficult to parse someone else’s slang or dialect as to master our own. One of the most common ‘twists’ to the language you’ll come across, particularly in BL manga, is the peculiar way that some guys speak.

Rutta: “全部もらうぜ。お前も、夢も、手放す気なんてねえんだ。” (“I’m gonna have it all; I don’t plan on letting go of you or my dream.”)

The ~ねえ construction is one many of us have probably encountered before, if you’ve read any manga involving uber-manly characters. But the language warping doesn’t end there.

This kind of slang takes any verb or adjective ending in -ai and -oi and turns them into -ee.

kitanai —> kitanee (汚えぇ, dirty)
umai —> umee (うめぇ, tasty)
osoi —> osee (おせぇ, slow)
ikanai —> ikanee (行かねぇ, won’t go)

So any time you see a ~manly guy~ use a word you don’t know that ends in ~ねえ or ~え, consider that he might be using an -ai/-oi adjective or a plain negative verb!

linguisdicks:

Meanings…nothing more than meeeeaaanings

Furigana are the little bitty kana written above/beside kanji to tell readers how to read a certain character. They’re a great help when you want to read manga but don’t quite have the kanji skills to do so yet, but…not all furigana are created equal!

In the top panel, we have some song lyrics, which read (middle verse):

Oishi: “「まっぴら」と手をひらり 渦を巻く花びらメロディ、飛び出すテニスボール 拾った 逢った 運命の彼に” (“The melody of the swirling flower petals, lightly grazing my hand. I picked up the tennis ball flying towards me and met the man [person] of my destiny”)

Yeah. The lyrics are pretty suggestive. Even more so when you take into account that they’re directed at the character’s doubles partner (he’s a tennis player) and that the seiyuu himself penned the lyrics.

Our point of focus, here, is on “彼”. If you look at the lyrics booklet shot, you can see that there are furigana above the kanji. This character is read かれ (kare) and means man/he/him. It’s completely and 100% masculine, and the basis of 彼氏 (kareshi, “boyfriend”).

However, the furigana above the character tell you how to read it in this particular instance: ひと (hito, person).

So why use 彼, if the lyricist wanted it sung a completely different way—as ひと? Why not just put 人 (hito) in the first place?

Writers do this when they want to embed multiple meanings in a line—in this case, he wanted to have person sung, but for the audience to know he was talking about a specific person, a man—the character’s doubles partner. It’s Japan’s version of the double entendre, in this case!

But furigana to offer an alternate reading isn’t always suggestive, instead functioning to clarify. See the second panel, from Setsuna Graffiti:

Nade: “ジンさんは如月煙火店の4代目だ。” (“Jin-san is the fourth-generation owner of this place.”)

"如月煙火店" literally means "Kisaragi Fireworks Shop", but this unwieldy mouthful is reduced, through furigana, to simple ここ ("here/this place"). Why? Mostly because it would be more natural to just say "here" in Japanese, since the characters would know what "here" meant from context, but using the actual name of the place helps to remind us—the reader—of what "this place" is. It’s like having a conversation with your friend and inviting them over to "my house" instead of, "the Johnson family home" or something.

tags:
#ac unity
Si on vit sans but, on mourra pour rien.

(Source: ahtabai)

tags:
#omfg
#dat post
#dat tag

leviswaxedass:

dahniwitchoflight:

leviswaxedass:

disneydamselestelle:

scottylubemeup:

THIS WAS A CHILDRENS MOVIE

A CHILDRENS BIBLE MOVIE

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) Amen

FUN FACT: in hebrew, “feet” is a euphemism for genitals.

so if you ever see “washing feet” in the bible, it, uh. yeah.

(source is my old bible class textbook which i don’t have on me anymore :( )

HOLY SHIT WHAT

I MEAN CORRECT ME IF IM WRONG BUT I SWEAR TO GOD I REMEMBER READING A STORY IN THE BIBLE WHERE JESUS CLEANED THE ‘FEET’ OF A LADY PROSTITUTE INFRONT OF HIS TWELVE DISCIPLES WHO GOT SERIOUSLY GROSSED OUT. THEM GETTING REALLY SUPER GROSSED OUT BY THAT NEVER MADE SENSE TO ME UNTIL NOW.

JESUS CHRIST JESUS.

YOU NASTY.

#WHAT ARE YOU SUPPOSED TO DO WHEN JESUS IS THE ONE WHO NEEDS JESUS

THAT HASHTAG I”m—-—

(Source: ilavchuu)

(Source: akemihiro)

We will both become hokage, right..Obito?

(Source: valleyoftheend)